Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wrestling in College

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wrestling in College

    My son is being recruited to wrestle, but is a little concerned abouth the time commitment. Academics have always been #1 (currently in college level math as a senior) and he wants to make sure there are no conflicts and still have time to get out on his own (wresting, school and friends). We have assured him there is time in the day for it all, but being parents no credit is given.

    What are the experiences out there. Is there time to see your non-wrestling friends, get all of the difficult course work done, hit the weights and wrestling practice.

    Combined with that, what are the post collegiate benefits have you experienced from wrestling in college.

  • #2
    He sounds to me like a perfect candidate for a good DIII school, where academics DOES come first. Wrestling can be competitive, but the classroom is why most of the wrestlers are in college at a DIII school. There are some really good ones in the Midwest with very good academics and also good wrestling. The important thing is to match his area of interest to what the school offers and combine that with a school that offers wrestling.
    "Boys freestyle. Real men Greco."

    Comment


    • #3
      It depends on the school he wants to go to. Where is he looking?

      Comment


      • #4
        Since this is my third year now here, I now know the routine pretty well. Our practices once the season starts are from 6:30-8 in the morning, and 3:30-5:30 in the afternoon. This leaves the day for classes. I have classes at 9, 10 and 1 on M-W-F and 9:30 and 11:00 on Tuesdays and Thursdays. At night is when the studying gets done or you can hang out with your friends, depending on the work load for that night. Scheduling classes for the right time of the day is very important, but it is extremely possible for all this to get done at its best level. My roommate Kalen Knull is in the P.T. school here, and has the worst workload I have ever seen, and he still manages to get great grades and excel in his field. Whether he wants DI or DIII, I am sure he will be fine if he puts his time in.
        The Only thing you deserve is what you earn, so why not just earn it all???

        Comment


        • #5
          I like that Academics are #1 with him!! Good job instilling that mindset.
          My input is secondhand as I'm not the wrestler, my son is. He also put Academics #1 and was able to make the best of both situations going to a top school for Engineering and wrestle for a D1 program. If your son is being recruited by an upper level program, the time commitment might be heavier than it would at a DIII school, but it is doable.
          As far as seeing his non-wrestling friends from HS, those friendships will diminish with time...just a fact....unless he is going to go to school in the same town as they are. They'll get together for the first semester whenever they can and then it will be hit or miss until it's mainly just text messaging and the occassional visit. Of course my son's school is 11+ hours away by car so distance is a big factor there too.
          The thing I saw with my son was wrestling was his life before college (and schoolwork) and it allowed him an immediate identity on campus when he got there. There is an automatic network of friends with the same interests and time constraints.
          Also, I believe most college programs have tutoring, or at least assistance, with classwork that isn't as readily available to the non-athlete student. One of the perks.
          "Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it"

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ghost Rider View Post
            My son is being recruited to wrestle, but is a little concerned abouth the time commitment. Academics have always been #1 (currently in college level math as a senior) and he wants to make sure there are no conflicts and still have time to get out on his own (wresting, school and friends). We have assured him there is time in the day for it all, but being parents no credit is given.

            What are the experiences out there. Is there time to see your non-wrestling friends, get all of the difficult course work done, hit the weights and wrestling practice.

            Combined with that, what are the post collegiate benefits have you experienced from wrestling in college.

            www.dbq.edu university of dubuque. Our wrestling team will be very competitive this year. Also in 2005 UD had the #2 academic team in the country and the #5 academic team last year. Coach McGovern schedules practices and study tables very well so we can succeed both on and off the mat. P-mail me if you have any questions about the school we are doing a preview day this saturday also
            "Strength does not coming from winning. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength" Mahatma Ghandi

            Comment


            • #7
              This post will get moved soon...

              This is my 2nd time writing this! UGH!

              I agree with everyone 100%...

              It truly all depends. (My 1st post was better...)

              Attitude, I agree with you too...my son is 3 hours away, door-to-door. Almost perfect in every way.

              Friends will come and go - and, except for kids moving in junior high and below, high school to college is the difference in change most effecting on teenagers. The separation...the friends for life...all of it changes but - sometimes, the friends in high school will prevail - even if depleted over time.

              I may - quite well, have more experience in this in time, but - for right now, my son has his friends coming to college, and meeting him when he is home just as if he NEVER left!

              So, again...3 hours vs. 11 has it's good and bad on both notes. I think in this day and age - teenage friends are more likely to "check-in" on each other. Far more avenues than we had. Even 10 years ago.

              DIII is - again, IMHO - better for the academic aspect. Which for the vast majority IS the main overall issue.

              Schultz133 is correct. UD and the head coach, Jon McGovern, are putting together a future of wrestling and are going to make their mark in years to come.

              Sometimes it's not only the college, but the coach, college, staff, support, etc., etc. And, if you want to wrestle...ya know? Be "on" the mat.

              It's sometimes a toss up going to each individual situation. We all want the next Carl, Dan, heck; Payton, Jordan, etc. Well, okay - stop me!

              Comment


              • #8
                You can do both at a Division 1 top academic school if you are focused enough. Eric Tannenbaum is a three time AA at Michigan with a 3.8 GPA in neuroscience planning to go to Medical School. No need to choose D3 to cancentrate on academics.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Also depends on how well you get along with your coach. D1 isnt for everyone and either is d3 d2 or juco. Some people like Tannenbaum have phenomenal time magemnet and can handle big ten school work and wreslting. While others love d3 cause they get the acadmeic attnetion and wresltign attention from coach like thy did in high school. all depends on what the athlete wants
                  on my best day I can beat anyone. On my worst day I could beat anyone-gl

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Perfection! Welcome, again to greenlantern!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have to echo what some of the other posters have already said.

                      I played football and wrestled for 4 years at a DIII school (Augie in the mid-late 80s) The time commitment was certainly intense with both, and I even toyed with throwing the shot in the spring, but decided I needed a bit of a break. I managed the extra time in the fall and winter quarters by taking a bit lighter load, then making up 1 or 2 classes in the summer session each year. It ended up I really didn't need that, and only took one class during the spring session of my senior year (hard period to remember!).

                      The key is to find a place that fits you from an academic, social, and athletic standpoint. For me, it was in that order, though depending on the level of athletic competition it may differ for your son. Above all else, I would tell him to find some place he feels comfortable in those three areas (the coach is key here), and he will get the support he needs to thrive in all aspects of college life.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think the DI, DII and DIII debate all depends on the individual school. I went to a DIII school and although I had a great experience, we had people graduate from there that could not write a complete sentence. I can't say that academics were highly regarded. I have been attending NIU for my Masters degree and the classes have been much more difficult than anything I had in my undergrad experience. I think it just depends on the individual school. I am sure there are other people who can report "idiots" that graduated with degrees.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X