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  #1  
Old 05-28-2019
lauden swain lauden swain is offline
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PA Requests Reduction In Weight Classes

I realize numbers and weights need a close look but I'm not a fan of this petition.

Not sure that we need reduction. Consider adjusting weight classes as reflection of weights with the most bodies. Guessing 125-160? Any research?

PA desired lineup only has one weight between 170 and 215?

Not a fan......

Lauden



The Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA) board of directors has voted to petition the National Federation of State High School Associations next year if the NFHS does not reduce the number of the wrestling weight classes from 14 to 12 for the 2020-21 school year ... all with the idea of reducing forfeits, especially in the lower weight classes.

Right now, the 14 weight classes are: 106, 113, 120, 126, 132, 138, 145, 152, 160, 170, 182, 195, 220, and 285 pounds. With the proposed change, the 12 new weight classes would be 110, 118, 125, 132, 138, 145, 152, 160, 170, 190, 215, and 285 pounds.

The PIAA proposal to the NFHS is for a three-year pilot program to see if reconfiguring the weight classes reduces the number of forfeits in high school wrestling in the Keystone State.

As PIAA executive director Robert Lombardi told PennLive.com's's Dustin Hockensmith, "We've had a couple years to look at it and probably next year will be the third, maybe the fourth, that these weight classes have seen an increasing number of forfeits in the lower weights. We think our proposal is a better distribution than 14 and cuts down the number of forfeits and make dual meets more pleasing to fans and to coaches."

The reduction in number of weight classes comes at a cost: fewer wrestlers will be able to compete in varsity matches throughout the dual-meet season ... and in individual competition in the postseason.

The issue of forfeits is one that many state athletic associations and their member high schools have been wrestling with for a number of years. The PIAA weight-class reduction proposal, coming from a state that is widely considered to be a hotbed of amateur wrestling in the U.S., is sure to be discussed well beyond the borders of Pennsylvania, where 9,720 wrestlers compete at 486 high schools. After all, the sport has a long history in Pennsylvania, with the first program taking to the mat at Bethlehem Liberty High in 1923. The first PIAA state wrestling championships took place in 1938 at Penn State's Rec Center. Back then, there were ten weight classes: 85, 95, 105, 115, 125, 135, 145, 155, 165 and 185 pounds.
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  #2  
Old 05-29-2019
formersomeone formersomeone is offline
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Very few schools fill 14 weight classes. I am sure someone has the data on which weights have the most/least entries in the state series. Would be interesting to see exactly where every weight stands.
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  #3  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
GETOFFYOURHIP GETOFFYOURHIP is offline
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Did this go anywhere? Is PA going to 12 weights?
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  #4  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
PRW PRW is offline
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Weight classes

Many small schools struggle with filling all fourteen weight classes, and having forfeits at every dual meet is bad for the sport. However, I would never be in favor of limited opportunities for kids while we are trying to grow our numbers at the same time. I heard an interesting proposal come out of Iowa where rural conferences would the choice to use 10 or 12 weight classes at all dual meets, tournaments, and conference events but return to the 14 weight classes for the state series. I would be in support of something like this.
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  #5  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
Rob Sherrill Rob Sherrill is offline
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The two most forfeited weight classes are 106 and 113, followed by any one of the four from 182 to 195. You have to put the weight classes where the wrestlers are. Wrestling should not be engaging in social engineering. One fewer at the bottom and at the top, one more in the middle.

I have performed and published research on this for years. The current set of weight classes doesn't work for the wrestling population as it currently sits. The weight classes should follow the population, not the other way around.

The only problem with Pennsylvania's proposal is reducing the number of weight classes from 14 to 12. An odd number would have killed two birds with one stone - better serving the population and eliminating the need for the silly criteria system.
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  #6  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
PRW PRW is offline
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Good point

Rob,


In theory I agree with your points. However, if we are trying to increase participation, decreasing the number of weight classes does not serve that need. There is something else we need to discuss in this equation. How are coaches "recruiting" more wrestlers in their communities? Are they coaching football? Working with the football coaches? Are they running youth programs? Convincing middle schools to start teams? Are they beating the bushes?

You cannot decide to cut weight classes until all of those questions are answered. I would argue that we should be educating coaches on how to get more kids to wrestle. Not talking about cutting weight classes.
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  #7  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
silent n deadly silent n deadly is offline
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I completely disagree with reducing the weight classes. One of the great things about this sport is that people of all builds & sizes can participate. Yes many schools forfeit at the lower weights. But, many times it’s because a coach May coach to allow an inexperienced or under sized guy wrestle varsity.

My local hs team currently has a very good upperclassmen wrestling 106, a small sophmore who weighs in around 100 and freshman who weights about 90.

Cut that 106 spot and all 3 may likely leave the sport.
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  #8  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
Cfc46 Cfc46 is offline
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How about giving each team one weight class where they don't give up the points for forfeit,that weight class must be declared before weigh in with referee present
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  #9  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
Earl Campbell Earl Campbell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cfc46 View Post
How about giving each team one weight class where they don't give up the points for forfeit,that weight class must be declared before weigh in with referee present
You will then have teams forfeiting weight classes just to avoid giving up 6 by pin. Coaches will just hold a wrestler out of the lineup where it's obvious a pin will be the result.
Don't cut the little guys out. They are usually the most exiting guys to watch wrestle. Forfeits happen in every weight class. Don't reduce participation when you are trying to grow the sport. Forfeits have always been a part of wrestling and they always will. That's why they have the rule. Some sports aren't allowed to be played unless you have a specified number of players.
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  #10  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
GETOFFYOURHIP GETOFFYOURHIP is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GETOFFYOURHIP View Post
Did this go anywhere? Is PA going to 12 weights?
So does anyone know if this passed? I can't find anything on the web if it passed or not.
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