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  #1  
Old 05-26-2019
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Blonjuan44 Blonjuan44 is offline
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Measles in Illinois

Don't be surprised this fall is sports are effected by the measles issue, in particular wrestling.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...519-story.html
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  #2  
Old 05-27-2019
MAL MAL is offline
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Originally Posted by Blonjuan44 View Post
Don't be surprised this fall is sports are effected by the measles issue, in particular wrestling.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...519-story.html
the patient “is an international traveler who was in several countries that are experiencing measles outbreaks.”

It would have been easier to say that the patient is an illegal Alien.
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Old 05-27-2019
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the patient “is an international traveler who was in several countries that are experiencing measles outbreaks.”

It would have been easier to say that the patient is an illegal Alien.
Yep, but then it wouldn't help that DACA, illegal immigrant "pathway" to cut the line, amnesty agenda...
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  #4  
Old 05-27-2019
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Originally Posted by Blonjuan44 View Post
Don't be surprised this fall is sports are effected by the measles issue, in particular wrestling.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...519-story.html
This likely applies to me about wrestling, but at least I am willing to admit it:
(note, this is in reply to my own post.)
This inability to accurately appraise one’s own knowledge is called the Dunning-Kruger effect, first identified in social psychology. Dunning-Kruger effects occur when individuals’ lack of knowledge about a particular subject leads them to inaccurately gauge their expertise on that subject. Ignorance of one’s own ignorance can lead people who lack knowledge on a subject think of themselves as more expert than those who are comparatively better informed.

https://www.texmed.org/Template.aspx?id=48227
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  #5  
Old 05-28-2019
MAL MAL is offline
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Originally Posted by Blonjuan44 View Post
This likely applies to me about wrestling, but at least I am willing to admit it:
(note, this is in reply to my own post.)
This inability to accurately appraise one’s own knowledge is called the Dunning-Kruger effect, first identified in social psychology. Dunning-Kruger effects occur when individuals’ lack of knowledge about a particular subject leads them to inaccurately gauge their expertise on that subject. Ignorance of one’s own ignorance can lead people who lack knowledge on a subject think of themselves as more expert than those who are comparatively better informed.

https://www.texmed.org/Template.aspx?id=48227
I am not apposed to vaccines...I believe that they overwhelmingly do more good than harm, but to deny that they do in fact do harm to some people would be dishonest. Some people have had bad reactions to vaccines and some have even died. My opinion on vaccines is that people should get them...but not be forced against their will to get vaccinated. Now if a person chooses to not get vaccinated, then they can be denied access to public venues like school or daycare or even a place of work. I believe in freedom of choice, even if that choice is wrong in the opinion of others.
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  #6  
Old 05-29-2019
MAL MAL is offline
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Originally Posted by Blonjuan44 View Post
This likely applies to me about wrestling, but at least I am willing to admit it:
(note, this is in reply to my own post.)
This inability to accurately appraise one’s own knowledge is called the Dunning-Kruger effect, first identified in social psychology. Dunning-Kruger effects occur when individuals’ lack of knowledge about a particular subject leads them to inaccurately gauge their expertise on that subject. Ignorance of one’s own ignorance can lead people who lack knowledge on a subject think of themselves as more expert than those who are comparatively better informed.

https://www.texmed.org/Template.aspx?id=48227
You could fill a set of encyclopedias with all the times that the experts were wrong.

"Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers predicted that if Donald Trump were elected, there would be a protracted recession within 18 months.

Heeding its experts, a month before the election, the Washington Post ran an editorial with the headline “A President Trump could destroy the world economy.” Steve Rattner, a Democratic financier and former head of the National Economic Council, warned, “If the unlikely event happens and Trump wins, you will see a market crash of historic proportions.”

When Trump’s electoral victory became apparent, Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman warned that the world was “very probably looking at a global recession, with no end in sight.” By the way, Krugman has been so wrong in so many of his economic predictions, but that doesn’t stop him from making more shameless predictions.

People whom we’ve trusted as experts have often been wrong beyond imagination, and it’s nothing new. Irving Fisher, a distinguished Yale University economics professor in 1929, predicted, “Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau.” Three days later, the stock market crashed.

The liberal Left continue to push their radical agenda against American values. The good news is there is a solution. Find out more >>

In 1945, regarding money spent on the Manhattan Project, Adm. William Leahy told President Harry S. Truman, “That is the biggest fool thing we have ever done. The [atomic] bomb will never go off, and I speak as an expert in explosives.”

In 1903, the president of the Michigan Savings Bank, advising Henry Ford’s lawyer not to invest in Ford Motor Co., said, “The horse is here to stay, but the automobile is only a novelty—a fad.” Confidence in the staying power of the horse was displayed by a 1916 comment of the aide-de-camp to Field Marshal Douglas Haig at a tank demonstration: “The idea that cavalry will be replaced by these iron coaches is absurd. It is little short of treasonous.”

Albert Einstein predicted: “There is not the slightest indication that nuclear energy will ever be obtainable. It would mean that the atom would have to be shattered at will.” In 1899, Charles H. Duell, the U.S. commissioner of patents, said, “Everything that can be invented has been invented.” Listening to its experts in 1936, The New York Times predicted, “A rocket will never be able to leave the Earth’s atmosphere.”

To prove that it’s not just academics, professionals, and businesspeople who make harebrained predictions, Hall of Fame baseball player Tris Speaker’s 1919 advice about Babe Ruth was, “Taking the best left-handed pitcher in baseball and converting him into a right fielder is one of the dumbest things I ever heard.” For those of us not familiar with baseball, Babe Ruth was one of the greatest outfielders who ever played the game.

The world’s greatest geniuses are by no means exempt from out-and-out nonsense. Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) was probably the greatest scientist of all time. He laid the foundation for classical mechanics; his genius transformed our understanding of physics, mathematics, and astronomy.

What’s not widely known is that Newton spent most of his waking hours on alchemy. Some of his crackpot experiments included trying to turn lead into gold. He wrote volumes on alchemy, but after his death, Britain’s Royal Society deemed that they were “not fit to be printed.”

Then there’s mathematical physicist and engineer Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), whose major contribution was in thermodynamics. Kelvin is widely recognized for determining the correct value of absolute zero, approximately minus 273.15 degrees Celsius or minus 459.67 degrees Fahrenheit. In honor of his achievement, extremely high and extremely low temperatures are expressed in units called kelvins.

To prove that one can be a genius in one area and an idiot in another, Kelvin challenged geologists by saying that Earth is between 20 million and 100 million years old. Kelvin predicted, “X-rays will prove to be a hoax.” And he told us, “I can state flatly that heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible.”

The point of all this is to say that we can listen to experts but take what they predict with a grain or two of salt."
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  #7  
Old 05-29-2019
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Thankfully, we don't have to consider the veracity of climate change science. Virtually everyone who stands to profit from it has already confirmed as much. So lucky we have the brave and noble souls looking out for us that we do.
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  #8  
Old 05-30-2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAL View Post
You could fill a set of encyclopedias with all the times that the experts were wrong.

"Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers predicted that if Donald Trump were elected, there would be a protracted recession within 18 months.

Heeding its experts, a month before the election, the Washington Post ran an editorial with the headline “A President Trump could destroy the world economy.” Steve Rattner, a Democratic financier and former head of the National Economic Council, warned, “If the unlikely event happens and Trump wins, you will see a market crash of historic proportions.”

When Trump’s electoral victory became apparent, Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman warned that the world was “very probably looking at a global recession, with no end in sight.” By the way, Krugman has been so wrong in so many of his economic predictions, but that doesn’t stop him from making more shameless predictions.

People whom we’ve trusted as experts have often been wrong beyond imagination, and it’s nothing new. Irving Fisher, a distinguished Yale University economics professor in 1929, predicted, “Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau.” Three days later, the stock market crashed.

The liberal Left continue to push their radical agenda against American values. The good news is there is a solution. Find out more >>

In 1945, regarding money spent on the Manhattan Project, Adm. William Leahy told President Harry S. Truman, “That is the biggest fool thing we have ever done. The [atomic] bomb will never go off, and I speak as an expert in explosives.”

In 1903, the president of the Michigan Savings Bank, advising Henry Ford’s lawyer not to invest in Ford Motor Co., said, “The horse is here to stay, but the automobile is only a novelty—a fad.” Confidence in the staying power of the horse was displayed by a 1916 comment of the aide-de-camp to Field Marshal Douglas Haig at a tank demonstration: “The idea that cavalry will be replaced by these iron coaches is absurd. It is little short of treasonous.”

Albert Einstein predicted: “There is not the slightest indication that nuclear energy will ever be obtainable. It would mean that the atom would have to be shattered at will.” In 1899, Charles H. Duell, the U.S. commissioner of patents, said, “Everything that can be invented has been invented.” Listening to its experts in 1936, The New York Times predicted, “A rocket will never be able to leave the Earth’s atmosphere.”

To prove that it’s not just academics, professionals, and businesspeople who make harebrained predictions, Hall of Fame baseball player Tris Speaker’s 1919 advice about Babe Ruth was, “Taking the best left-handed pitcher in baseball and converting him into a right fielder is one of the dumbest things I ever heard.” For those of us not familiar with baseball, Babe Ruth was one of the greatest outfielders who ever played the game.

The world’s greatest geniuses are by no means exempt from out-and-out nonsense. Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) was probably the greatest scientist of all time. He laid the foundation for classical mechanics; his genius transformed our understanding of physics, mathematics, and astronomy.

What’s not widely known is that Newton spent most of his waking hours on alchemy. Some of his crackpot experiments included trying to turn lead into gold. He wrote volumes on alchemy, but after his death, Britain’s Royal Society deemed that they were “not fit to be printed.”

Then there’s mathematical physicist and engineer Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), whose major contribution was in thermodynamics. Kelvin is widely recognized for determining the correct value of absolute zero, approximately minus 273.15 degrees Celsius or minus 459.67 degrees Fahrenheit. In honor of his achievement, extremely high and extremely low temperatures are expressed in units called kelvins.

To prove that one can be a genius in one area and an idiot in another, Kelvin challenged geologists by saying that Earth is between 20 million and 100 million years old. Kelvin predicted, “X-rays will prove to be a hoax.” And he told us, “I can state flatly that heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible.”

The point of all this is to say that we can listen to experts but take what they predict with a grain or two of salt."
I'm going to give Tris Speaker a break because at one time Babe Ruth held the record for scoreless innings pitched in a World Series game. People who don't know baseball history don't know how great a pitcher Babe Ruth actually was. I would also say that the deal that sent Babe Ruth from Boston to New York was easily one of the WORST in baseball history.
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  #9  
Old 06-01-2019
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Blonjuan44 Blonjuan44 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blonjuan44 View Post
This likely applies to me about wrestling, but at least I am willing to admit it:
(note, this is in reply to my own post.)
This inability to accurately appraise one’s own knowledge is called the Dunning-Kruger effect, first identified in social psychology. Dunning-Kruger effects occur when individuals’ lack of knowledge about a particular subject leads them to inaccurately gauge their expertise on that subject.

Ignorance of one’s own ignorance can lead people who lack knowledge on a subject think of themselves as more expert than those who are comparatively better informed.

https://www.texmed.org/Template.aspx?id=48227
https://climate.nasa.gov/
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  #10  
Old 06-03-2019
MAL MAL is offline
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What is your evidence that any of those stats are bad for the earth?

What is earths perfect temperature?

What is the perfect blend of co2 and oxygen?

How much ice do we need to maintain our current climate?

None of your doomsday stories answer any of those questions...they just say humans bad...give me some money so I can study how bad humans really are.

None of NASA's stats are unusual if you look at it from a historical perspective.

https://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/06/...ioxide-levels/

http://joannenova.com.au/2010/02/the...rature-swings/

https://principia-scientific.org/arc...c-high-levels/
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